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Category: bees

Robotics | IoT

Building A Bee Sucking Vacuum

When you need to move a lot of bees, maybe a vacuum is the perfect tool.
Read more on MAKE
The post Building A Bee Sucking Vacuum appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Build a Backyard Bee Hotel

Ideas and instructions for building a 5-star bee hotel for solitary bees
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The post Build a Backyard Bee Hotel appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Rockin’ 26’ Drivable Bumbleebee Shoots Fire from Its Antennae

The buzz about this year’s Maker Faire Bay Area is that a sweet, bee-themed art car called Apis Inlusio will be there. Lovingly built by a group of self-taught Burning Man veterans appropriately known as BeeCharge Camp, the Apis Inlusio combines …

How to Make a Safe Watering Hole for Bees

It’s spring and that means it’s time for nature’s critical pollinators to get busy. As you undoubtedly know, bee populations are in trouble and can use any kind of help they can get. Bees work hard this time of year and need available…

Ingenious Hive Design Gives You Honey on Tap

There’s a new way to collect honey and it’s never been sweeter. Flow Hive may have solved the hassle of getting the honey from the hive. Father and son team Stuart and Cedar Anderson have come up a great solution that offers honey on tap st…

Sculptor Collaborates With Bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck embraces the collaborative spirit by creating these fascinating sculptures with the help of some honey bees.Read more on MAKE

The 3-B Printing Project

A beekeeper and a 3D printer were brought together, along with 80,000 bees, to create some astonishing objects as a promo for Dewar’s Highlander Honey called The 3-B Printing Project.Read more on MAKE

Maker Faire New York: Real Time Bee Counter with Cloud Datalogging

From Instructables user hydronics comes this electronic bee-counter that mounts over a hive’s entrance, dividing it into many channels, each as wide as a single bee, and each equipped with a pair of IR reflectance sensors. When a bee passes through, the order in which the sensors are tripped reveals if it is coming or going.